Graduate School

Graduate School of Home and Life Sciences

Objectives

The Graduate School of Home and Life Sciences is divided into two departments. Students in the Department of Home and Life Sciences focus on either apparel or housing and design, while students in the Department of Applied Nutrition explore the relationship between food and health. Students here pursue studies aimed at improving the quality of life and health. These three factors essential to living, that is, clothing, housing, nutrition and food, are studied from the viewpoint "health and safety," "comfort and convenience," "space" and "autonomy." Based on this philosophy, the School holds two clear objectives towards education and research.

  1. The School of Home and Life Sciences aims to train people to have the ability to grasp various situational problems and to have the ability to solve such problems so as to improve the quality of life.
    Such students, as needed human resources, should gain an understanding of human life through scientific research as well as having an anthropological view of what it is to be comfortable and healthy. They should be able to discover the problems of human life at various levels, such as at the individual level, the family level, as well as at the local community level, and then they should be able to work actively to resolve those problems.
  2. The School of Home and Life Sciences aims to develop an awareness in students so that they will be committed to actively solving problems by effective analysis of the problems in any given region.
    In response to a request from the local community, graduates will research the lifestyle and health problems faced by the region by focusing on its clothing, food and housing. They will also develop a close cooperation with local communities and government in order to carry out any business there.

Admissions Requirements and Special Information for Incoming Students

  1. The School of Home and Life Sciences is co-educational, and applications from both male and female candidates will be reviewed for possible acceptance.
  2. Students who have employment and who graduated from a college two years prior to entry can apply for an exemption of tuition fees should they become third year students.
  3. A student who has working experience of three or more years can sit for a "special examination for working people." This examination will consist of a short written essay and an interview. Upon acceptance, the applicant may apply for an exemption of tuition fees should their studies carry on to a third year.
  4. In principle, the School of Home and Life Sciences requires students to acquire units by attending regular weekday classes, but will take into account situations where a student wishes to continue to work.
  5. Each student must acquire the minimum number of units as stipulated by the School of Home and Life Sciences regulations in order to complete the course.
  6. Other than six credits for the final thesis and two credits for the preliminary research subject, the School of Home and Life Sciences requires that all students attend two special lectures; one on Life Sciences (4 credits) and the other on Local Culture (4 credits). All other credits required for graduation can be gained from elective subjects.
  7. Each student will be assigned an adviser from amongst the professorial board. Each supervisor will help students focus on practical aspects of their research as well as give advice on developing the main research theme. After students submit their master's thesis and complete a defense of their research, they will be awarded 6 credits.
  8. It is recommended that students obtain a wide range of appropriate knowledge related to the improvement of human life, rather than to confine themselves solely to its specialized areas of human life or health science for the master's thesis.
  9. Students are required to enroll for two or more years and to acquire 30 or more credits from the various subjects offered. They are also required to submit a thesis paper (evaluation including preliminary research guidance and defense of research upon completion). However, a student whose academic performance surpasses the norm, may complete their course of study in less than two years.

Graduate School of Cultural Development

The Graduate School of Cultural Development is divided into two departments. Students who enter the Department of Cultural Development can chose to focus their studies on one of three major areas: Japanese Language and Literature, English Language and British and American Literature, or Cultural Development. Students who enter the Department of Primary Education can focus of action research within the preschool or primary school classroom, or that can focus on education methodology.

Objectives

Students who wish to focus their studies on Japanese Language and Literature will be able to master the art of calligraphy, classical Japanese and Chinese verse, or modern Japanese and Japanese literature. Beyond attaining expertise in their particular field of research, they may also wish to enhance their teaching qualifications. Similarly, students who wish to focus their studies on English Language and British and American Literature may choose to concentrate on the field of linguistics, communication, British literature, or American literature. Beyond attaining expertise in their particular field of research, they may also wish to upgrade their teaching qualifications. The area of Cultural Development focuses on the recording and editing of cultural artifacts, along with the creation of a comprehensive digital archive from which various educational institutions may take and effectively use resources. Beyond attaining expertise in their particular field of research, they may also wish to upgrade their teaching qualifications or attain other certificates such as needed when working in libraries or museum. Along with a content specific Digital Archives course, there is also an Educational Resources Development course available.

In the Department of Primary Education, integrated and interdisciplinary education is offered. Students research the science of early childhood education as well as various related academic fields. Students attending courses in this department will be trained to become educators who have both practical skills and a high degree of expertise. Graduates will have the skills and insights in order to deal with the increasingly complex problems arising within modern society. As one aim of this department is to present a teaching climate compatible with a fusion of theory and practice graduates will also be tutored in information technology geared at creating a richer cultural environment in the classroom.

Admissions Requirements and Special Information for Incoming Students

  1. The School of Cultural Development is co-educational, and applications from both male and female candidates will be reviewed for possible acceptance.
  2. Students who have employment and who graduated from a college two years prior to entry can apply for an exemption of tuition fees should they become third year students.
  3. A student who has working experience of three or more years can sit for a "special examination for working people." This examination will consist of a short written essay and an interview. Upon acceptance, the applicant may apply for an exemption of tuition fees should their studies carry on to a third year.
  4. In principle, the School of Cultural Development requires students to acquire units by attending regular weekday classes, but will take into account situations where a student wishes to continue to work.
  5. In accordance with Article 14 of the Standards for the Establishment of Universities Law, the Department of Cultural Development conducts some its technology oriented classes or research guidance sessions at night or at other specified times. It should also be noted that some of the subjects are taught via distance education methods.
  6. Methods used for subjects taught via distance education mode are as follows: educational tuition is offered by Gifu Women's University to a satellite classroom (a satellite classroom being a room in which telecommunication equipment has been installed for the benefit of students at a branch school) or the student's residence if using an Internet connection. Tuition is given using two-way communication video-conferencing systems, the Internet, or by occasional in-house schooling.